Pain and Methylation

 

Treating Methylation Disorders – COMT and MAO

 

 
Listen to Dr. Rostenberg explain the significance of COMT and MAO polymorphisms on our brain function. In this video he illustrates how dopamine and epinephrine (adrenalin) are processed inside the brain. If the body gets this pathway balanced, we feel positive and calm, have focus and energy, and sleep through the night. If the body doesn’t balance this pathway, all sorts of health problems can result such as chronic fatigue, insomnia, depression, Parkinson’s Disease, and a host of other neurological problems. Remember that one gene doesn’t determine your fate. Understanding COMT is a key part of understanding methylation because this enzyme impacts both our hormones and our neurotransmitters.
 

Overlapping signatures of chronic pain in the DNA methylation landscape of prefrontal cortex and peripheral T cells.

We tested the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms in the brain and the immune system are associated with chronic pain. Genome-wide DNA methylation assessed in 9 months post nerve-injury (SNI) and Sham rats, in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as well as in T cells revealed a vast difference in the DNA methylation landscape in the brain between the groups and a remarkable overlap (72%) between differentially methylated probes in T cells and prefrontal cortex. Please click the below link to read more:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26817950

 

Plasticity of DNA methylation in a nerve injury model of pain.

The response of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) to injury may go together with alterations in epigenetics, a conjecture that has not been subjected to a comprehensive, genome-wide test. Using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, we report widespread remodeling of DNA methylation in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) occurring within 24 h of peripheral nerve ligation, a neuropathy model of allodynia. Please click the below link to read more:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25621511

 

Plasticity of DNA methylation in a nerve injury model of pain.

The response of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) to injury may go together with alterations in epigenetics, a conjecture that has not been subjected to a comprehensive, genome-wide test. Using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, we report widespread remodeling of DNA methylation in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) occurring within 24 h of peripheral nerve ligation, a neuropathy model of allodynia. Please click the below link to read more:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25621511

 

The Gut Origin of Methylation Problems

 

 
Our digestive tract influences our genes by producing compounds that interact with our methylation cycle – the gut can interfere with COMT, MAO, MTR and SULT pathways. In this Part 1 of 2 videos, listen to Dr. Rostenberg as he explains the connection between the health of the gut and the methylation cycle. If you would like help with your gut function to improve your methylation and reduce/eliminate your symptoms, please contact Dr. Rostenberg at Red Mountain Natural Medicine today.